ethiopienne:

on today’s episode of me having feelings, a series of tweets about “anti-rape nail polish.”

Karen Gillan-Guardians of the galaxy behind the scenes

“Here’s the problem: Soccer is enjoyed by people who inhabit the United States, but because many of those people may be first or second generation immigrants, and in many cases many not speak English or have English as a primary language, it’s not culturally relevant to include in debates about the popularity of sport. Close to 5 million people in the US watched the Liga MX (Mexican soccer league) final between Leon and Pachuca, a number that compares favorably with the ratings for MLB playoff games, but it’s irrelevant because either it was watched in Spanish or watched by Spanish-speakers, I’m not sure which.
[…]
So if a person on US soil watches a game in Spanish, are they a foreigner? Are they tuning in to a sport broadcast in a foreign language and that’s what makes it foreign? This narrative of a “big four” underscores a troubling assumption. A sport is only truly “popular” in the United States if English-speaking, native born people follow it. When they do, then we can call it an “American sport.” I’d argue that there is a deep cultural marginalization going on when the preferred sport of the largest-minority ethnic group in the United States is viewed as marginal because it’s not viewed by “the wrong people.” To say people don’t follow soccer in the United States is a veiled way of saying that it’s not viewed by people that matter.”

Soccer Isn’t Popular in the US Because the Wrong People Watch it (via queerandpresentdangr) —

  1. me:no one ever texts me
  2. *gets a text*
  3. me:wtf do you want

According to recent reports, your white friend on Facebook, whom you’ve always secretly suspected of being a latent racist, explained today through a series of passive-aggressive posts why she does not support the protesters of Ferguson, Missouri.

Saying that “it isn’t that big of a deal” and “people get shot all the time”, your white friend explained to what she imagined was an eager audience on Facebook why the residents of Ferguson are blowing this whole thing out of proportion.

"They’re just looking for an excuse to riot. They just always need something to be angry about, and feel oppressed over." While it was left ambiguous who the ‘they’ in the Facebook status referred to, some expert analyzers concluded that your white friend was referring to black people. Your white friend insisted she was not racist at all, and that in fact this entire ordeal had nothing at all to do with race, and that "they" should stop trying to make everything about race.

She then posted a number of articles and videos of police officers doing nice things, with the passive-aggressive addendum: “See? Not all cops are bad! So maybe all of you should stop shit-talking them!” Unable to explain how these random good deeds did anything to address the events in Ferguson, your white friend responded to criticisms saying, “Well my uncle is a police officer, and he’s an amazing person. He risks his life every day. And if you don’t like that, then fuck you Jennifer, I’m unfriending you.”

Your white friend’s final Facebook status on the matter concluded, “I might get hate for this, but I for one support all the brave men and women who risk their lives every day for us. And I support all of the brave officers in Ferguson who are only trying to their jobs. The problem here is all those ghetto thugs acting like animals. And see? I didn’t say anything about race! And all of that is why I don’t support these ridiculous protests. If you have a problem with that, then bye.” The status finished with an extraordinarily condescending smiley face.

Your White Friend On Facebook Explains Why She Doesn’t Support Ferguson

The Wishwashington Post

(via queerboochananbarnes) —

canadianvogue:

at work: ***flawless (feat. chimamanda ngozi adichie)

when i’m going out: ***flawless (feat. nicki minaj)

Above all, capitalism wastes human life. The U.S. spends billions to warehouse 2 million people—many of them young Black and Latino men—in overcrowded prisons. It provides sub-par education to millions of poor students, sending a message that their lives will amount to nothing.

Are people homeless in America because there’s a shortage of homes? And if that’s the case, is there a shortage of homes because we don’t have the concrete, the wood and the steel to build them?

The truth is that under capitalism, there’s no incentive to build low-cost housing for the homeless—because it isn’t profitable to do so.

The same goes for the more than 800 million people in the world who go hungry. It isn’t profitable to feed them. So food is stockpiled or destroyed rather than distributed to them.

Is the free market efficient? (via afghangst) —

keithboykin:

Twitter reacts to the Michael Dunn sentence today. Dunn was sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole.

glowcloud:

I am a little offended all the time but I still have fun

Viola Davis talks about the childhood hunger problem in the U.S. at Variety’s annual Power of Women luncheon. (x)

Sharon “I can’t keep my hands still” Belle

crazyress:

heyfunniest:

Someone took a candid photo of a fight in Ukranian Parliament that is as well-composed as the best renaissance art.

this is legitimately the best thing i’ve ever seen

caz-melanin:

halfblackandqueer:

sica49:

"Rahm Emanuel is not caring about our schools; he is not caring about our safety. He only cares about his kids. He only care about what he needs. He do not care about nobody else but himself.

He let Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a woman that’s from Detroit who don’t even know the streets of Chicago where I’m from, come in and close these schools.” [x]

Look at the passion y’all!!!

Teach the babies that their words matter yess

Omg yesss!!!

If we don’t teach our children well, we will have seriously failed them. 

"Education is a right, that is why we have to fight".

Salute.

“Wearing a hijab isn’t inherently liberating – but neither is baring one’s breasts. What is liberating is being able to choose either of these things. It’s pretty ludicrous to think that oppression is somehow proportional to how covered or uncovered someone’s body is. Both sides of this argument present a shallow understanding of women’s empowerment, which only drowns out the substantive challenges facing all women – issues that cannot be encapsulated in a debate about a piece of fabric.”

— Sara Yasin, Is the Hijab Worth Fighting Over? (via too-indie-for-you-bro) —

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